Mobile Medical Camps 

Through our mobile medical camps we are helping thousands who are in need of medical attention, all while displaying the love of Christ.
 

Medical camps, a major aspect of GFA World's supported medical ministry, bring skilled doctors, medical staff, medication and health training to areas where people rarely have the chance to see a doctor. These camps may be organized in remote villages, crowded slums—any place there is need and opportunity.

One camp typically serves anywhere from 200 to 1,000 children and adults. Local medical personnel are invited to serve at the camp, providing free pediatric and general health care, and eye checkups.

Medical Proximity

Prevention is better than cure. But what if you can't access either? Too poor to afford things like vitamins, fruits and vegetables—or routine doctor visits—families in poverty are left vulnerable against simple diseases, which can eventually threaten lives. Many in impoverished communities also have never been taught basic health and hygiene principles, which puts their families at additional risk of disease.
 

Some of the most common diseases are curable—even preventable. But many are suffering and dying from these treatable ailments. A cold can develop into pneumonia. Burns go untreated. Diarrhea ravages both the young and elderly. Anemia weakens bodies. Headaches and other warning signals of greater ailments must be ignored.

Family Impact

 

The impact of a medical camp can go far beyond a checkup or a round of antibiotics. Parents and children learn how to protect themselves from disease, which can influence lives years later. Medical camps also address false beliefs and fears about medicine that often hinder the sick or pregnant from seeking medical help.

A healthier family means more time spent at work instead of on sickbeds, more money spent on food and education instead of on medicine, and more hope for the future instead of premature death. Medical ministry also provides an opportunity for national workers to pray for those who are ill and build relationships with communities.